Brainstorm with Walt to Achieve Fame, Fortune – And Richer Creative Ideas

Brainstorms, Business Services

Fame. Fortune. Richer creative ideas. You want them.

Walt Jaschek wants you to have them.

That’s a win/win.

Walt Now Consulting. Your partner for better brainstorming since 1988.

Book a brainstorm.

Walt Jaschek in his home office. He’ll give you two of the most creative hours of your week.

Read more about brainstorming with Walt below.



What kinds of things can I brainstorm with Walt?

Any and all things. But usually Walt helps expand ideas in the creative spaces.

Projects needing shaping, cheering. Marketing and ad campaigns. Screenplays, teleplays, video scripts. Creative careers, endeavors and dreams.

What is a brainstorm?

Two or more people creating ideas, sharing ideas, and honing ideas toward a specific goal or metric.

It’s more fun that, though, right?

Ha! Yes. “Metric” is such a serious word. It just means, you’ll figure out where you’d like to be by the end of the session.

What if I don’t know my goal or metric?

Then that’s the first thing to be discussed in the brainstorm!

How are these brainstorms conducted?

By Skype or Zoom. In front of our computers.

Or live, in person. In front of a whiteboard at your place or ours.

What’s the length of these brainstorms?

90 minutes to 2 hours. Not exactly “deep dive.” More “medium dive.”

But medium dives can move you forward.

What have people said about booking a brainstorm with Walt?

Testimonials here.

Comments encouraged below.

How do I book a brainstorm with Walt?

Book a brainstorm.

And we’ll start a dialogue about topic, goals and timing.

How much does it cost to book a brainstorm?

$499 for 2 hours or less.

Do I get to keep the ideas we come up with in these brainstorms?

You do. They are yours to use at will.

What makes Walt qualified as a brainstormer?

License 89755 from the International Brainstormers Association.

Kidding. A lot of creative results for brands, individuals and teams. Happy clients.

Book a brainstorm.

Today.

What kind of whiteboard markers does Walt use?

An oddly specific question, but here they are.

Can I also hire Walt Now to create content beyond our brainstorm?

Yes. Here are some of the other services he offers.

But a brainstorm is still a good place to start, so

Book a brainstorm.

Today.

P.S. Here is a video of Walt waiting for you to

Book a brainstorm.

"Mr. Rippemoff" | Funny Radio Spot for NewsCenter 7 Wastebusters, Miami

Humor Writing, Radio Commercials, scriptwriting

Funny dialogue and theatre of the mind are at play in this radio spot for Miami’s NewsCenter 7 and their fraud-exposing team of reporters known as the Wastebusters. In it, a Miami businessman – Mr. Rippemoff – is not happy to hear from his assistant Dorothy that the Wastebusters are in his outer office. This is the kind of spot you don’t hear much anymore: a well acted and produced scene that’s more akin to what one of associates calls “adver-tainment.” It also helps to have clients who want it and appreciate it! (Bless ’em!) Turn up your speakers for…

:60 RADIO SCRIPT
“MISTER RIPPEMOFF”
For: NewsCenter 7 Wastebusters
Writer: Walt Jaschek
Producer: Paul Fey

SOUND FX: OFFICE INTERCOM BUZZES

DOROTHY THE ASSISTANT (voice over intercom): Mister Rippemoff?

MR. RIPPEMOFF: Yes, Dorothy?

DOROTHY: A reporter and crew from NewsCenter 7 Wastebusters is here to see you, sir.

MR. RIPPEMOFF: NewsCenter 7?

DOROTHY: Wastebusters. They expose mind-boggling wastes of taxpayers money right here in the Miami Valley.

MR. RIPPEMOFF: What do they want with me?

DOROTHY: They said you sold the government a ballpoint pen, sir.

MR. RIPPEMOFF: So?

DOROTHY: For a thousand dollars.

MR. RIPPEMOFF: Well, it came with refills.

DOROTHY: And a jar of paperclips for two thousand dollars.

MR. RIPPEMOFF: They were multi-colored paperclips.

DOROTHY: Uh-huh.

MR. RIPPEMOFF: Red ones, blue ones…

DOROTHY: What should I tell the Wastebusters, sir?

MR. RIPPEMOFF: Do they have lights and cameras?

DOROTHY: And the ballpoint pen, sir.

MR. RIPPEMOFF: Tell them I went out my window, down my fire escape, then booked down the street, screaming like a madman.

(beat)

DOROTHY: I don’t think they’ll believe that sir.

SOUND FX: FOOTSTEPS AND WINDOW OPENING

DOROTHY: Mister Rippemoff?

MR. RIPPEMOFF:  (SCREAMING)

DOROTHY: Uh-oh.

MUSIC, UNDER

ANNOUNCER: NewsCenter 7 Wastebusters expose government waste right here in the Miami Valley. And see the Wastebusters in action.

SOUND FX: OUTSIDE TRAFFIC

MR. RIPPEMOFF:  (STILL SCREAMING)

DOROTHY (yelling): You can’t escape them, sir! They’re the Wastebusters!

MR. RIPPEMOFF (running away): I know!

ANNOUNCER: NewsCenter 7 Wastebusters. Weeknights at 6. Coverage you can count on.

DOROTHY (to herself): They’ll find him.

MUSIC OUT

© Paul & Walt Worldwide

Whey, yes, we do have an entire playlist of funny radio commercials. It’s called 15 Funny Radio Commercials to Inspire More of the Same.

Star Trek: Picard Coming to CBS All Access: Handy Link, Classic Spots

Entertainment, Radio Commercials, TV Promotion

“Star Trek: Picard” starring Patrick Stewart premieres Thursday, Jan. 23 on the CBS All Access streaming service. You can try it for free and gets tons of Trek, old and new.

We’ve created a lot of Picard-loving content over the years, mostly for the beloved syndicated run of “Star Trek: the Next Generation.” As we eagerly await this new show, let’s look back on a couple of Paul & Walt radio spots that put Picard on a pedestal.

“Auditions” | Funny radio commercial featuring Patrick Stewart’s “try-out” for the show

“I’m Shaving My Head” | Funny radio spot featuring Picard fans emulating their hero

Writer: Walt Jaschek | Producer: Paul Fey

Hope you’ve enjoyed these audio flashbacks to an earlier era of Picard, and join us in counting down to the new show. Here’s the trailer.

Premieres 1/23/20 on CBS All Access

"Don't Drink And Shop on Amazon" | A Short, Cautionary Video

Walt a Life, Funny Stuff, Walt Jaschek on Camera

Today on Walt Now: a true story of some late-night Amazon shopping that might have involved a glass of wine or two. Walt Jaschek unboxes a package that arrived unexpectedly – and shows us what was inside.

Walt Jaschek unboxes the unexpected.

Lessons in Long-Form: How to Craft Readable Feature Articles

articles, Content Writing

Like finding $20 in your pocket, getting a bonus bag of Cheetos® from a vending machine, or learning Marvel Studios will be making Ant-Man 3, getting published and paid for it is still a thrill.

For example, I’m grateful and happy to have been published a few times this past year in #STLMADE, the online magazine celebrating lesser-known St. Louis achievers.

On assignment, I’ve written about a high-tech family firm making advanced timepieces for NASA; a unique roommate pairing service matching Millenials with seniors; and most recently, a profile of our region’s very own Horseshoe Pitchers Hall of Fame. (Who knew, right?)

The stories, also archived here, were a creative stretch for me. Yeah, I’ve written content articles in the past – who can forget my piece on the magic powers of ginseng? But I’m known mostly for funny commercials, the scripts for which can be created on the back of a bar napkin. And often are.

These feature stories are work, dammit, and make me appreciate more the people who craft them all the time.

I’ve made a few unauthorized notes about my recent experiences trying to be competent in this unfamiliar form. If you’re a writer heading into these waters, you might find a tip-bit. (That’s a tidbit that’s also a tip.)

1. Know what to leave out.

Michelangelo is often credited with saying, in response to questions about his sculpting process, “You take a piece of marble and chip away everything that doesn’t look like David.” Oh. Okay. Got it. Well, that’s the article, folks! Thanks for reading.

But seriously, to help know what to leave out:

2. Become one with your transcripts.

 “Transcripts” are in the news lately. They’re a thing, all right. The pubs for which I write are quick to provide transcribed text of recorded interviews. One such document recently came back at 16 single-spaced pages of 10-point type: about 12,000 words. The final story was to be 600 words, and of those, just half quotes. This means whittling the text down to 5% of itself. It’s like turning 50 Shades of Grey into one-half shade of grey. But:

3. Hang in there.

Some quotes shine on first scan. Just as often, something at the top of page 3 will connect with something at the bottom of page 15. So you have to decipher every word, no matter how inaccurately transcribed. (“Did he say ‘non-profit or ‘for profit?’ It says here, ‘Jimmy Buffet.’”) It’s a slog, but it’s necessary, so you’ll like it, saying, “Thank you, master, may I have another?”

4. Compress “The Origin Story.”

It’s human nature: everybody wants to tell their launch journey, i.e. “How We Got Here Through the Years.” But it’s good to cut these stories down to a critical mass, and certainly don’t lead with them. Though readers might like a little backstory, they really wanna know, “What’s in it for me now?” It’s like asking a friend if Macy’s still sells carpets, and the person answers by explaining in great detail how it used to be called Famous-Barr.

5. Learn to interrupt.

Seriously. Recently I was the off-camera interviewer in a big video shoot. Seldom have I had conversations with subjects as multiple cameras recorded and onlookers… looked on. In this case, I tossed the subject an opening softball. The person’s breathless answer lasted, according to a producer who timed it, almost 20 minutes. In a post-production meeting, I said, “I need to learn to interrupt.” My collaborators laughed, but it’s true: I need to learn to interrupt.

6. Have a back-up audio source.

Wonky but important tech tip: when you don’t have A/V support, you are your own production company. So have at least two devices on which to record. Before my most recent interview, I scored the Olympus VN-541PC Digital Voice Recorder. (Recommended.) Glad I did, because, as usual, the Voice Memos app on iPhone stopped recording mid-interview due to incoming calls. You’d think I’d go to Settings and fix this. Not sure I know how. Hence: two sources. Heck, make it three.

7. Check your politics at the door.

Hard but necessary, not just for interviews, but any kind of business interaction, as I’m sure all can relate. (How any person who works in a real office handles this these days is beyond me.) I bite my tongue continually, because I know no minds will be changed, or even budged, in casual conversation. But it creeps in. When a subject for a story missed his interview appointment, his assistant scrambled to contact him. “Not an emergency,” I said. “It’s not like this’ll be in tomorrow’s New York Times.

“Good,” the assistant said with a wry smile. “Because then we couldn’t talk to you.”

It was a joke. I think. I smiled back. But I also think, “You want exposure for your endeavor, but wouldn’t talk to the freakin’ New York Times?

We live in amazing times.

8. Choose your assignments wisely.

Easier said than done: you gotta make a living. For decades, in gratitude for opportunities, I clung to the axiom, “There are no boring subjects, only boring writers.” I’ve reconsidered. There are boring subjects. For example: I recently scrolled past a post linking to a published article, and for a half-second, thought, “I’d never read that.” Then I realized I wrote it.

I vow to be more careful, and to admit to editors, “I’m not right for this topic; it holds no interest for me.” I think they would appreciate that. Editors can’t read minds. They want a good fit. It’s another way you can:

9. Love your editors.

Bless them for their behind-the-scenes, often uncredited prep and leadership. I obey direction and appreciate sharp edits; the stories are always better for it. (This article could have used one!) But I also believe you should:

10. Love your readers.

So much of what I’m trying to do is simply keeping eyes moving down the page. Sometimes in my work I’m accused of being “funny” or “jokey” (or – ugh – “cute”,) but honest to God, I’m just trying to be interesting. That’s it. Interesting is the bar, and it will continue to be my mantra plodding forward. And in that regard:

If I got your eyes down this far down the page, I’m grateful.

Wait! Whaddaya mean, “I scrolled to get here?”

[Sigh.]

You can’t blame a guy for typing.

Walt Jaschek is available to write for your publication. Maybe. Let’s talk.

"Cellular Guy": Funny Radio Spot for Southwestern Bell Mobile Phones | Award-Winner

Humor Writing, Radio Commercials, Walt Jaschek on Camera

This radio commercial for early generation Southwestern Bell mobile phones established a lively, ear-catching format we used often: a stand-up comic tossing off one-liners about the product, interspersed with upbeat music. The one-liners were often self deprecating: hard to imagine brands having this much fun with themselves these days!

The spot won Clio Awards and Addy Awards, and established a campaign of spots that ran for months.

By the way, that image in the thumbnail is Walt himself, holding his beloved iPhone 7, recommended. Check Amazon for current pricing.

Script

Writer: Walt Jaschek
Producer: Paul Fey
Agency: Paul & Walt Worldwide

Urgent and lively MUSIC begins. It’s a version of “I Get Around,” a song originally recorded by The Beach Boys. The music drops out for observations about cell service from a very droll, dry stand-up comic.

“I GET AROUND” MUSIC UP AND OUT

COMIC: I get around. When I talk on a Southwestern Bell Cellular Phone, my voice is crystal clear. That’s amazing, considering it’s not really that clear in person.

MUSIC UP AND OUT

COMIC: I put a Southwestern Bell phone antenna on my head and walked into a crowded restaurant. Forty-two attorneys tried to “dial out” on me.

MUSIC UP AND OUT

COMIC: Southwestern Bell cell service is so clear, when I’m talking to my girlfriend, it’s as if she’s right next to me. I can actually hear her withdrawing.

MUSIC UP AND OUT

COMIC: Southwestern Bell has cell service that’s trouble-free. But then, trouble is always free.

ANNOUNCER: No wonder more people go more places… with Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems.

COMIC: Someday, Southwestern Bell will be able to break us down molecularly and send our bodies through cellular phones. This might be a long way off, but just in case, I’m getting a haircut.

MUSIC UP AND OUT

© Paul & Walt Worldwide